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Monthly Archives: April 2007

Dry winter helps butterflies, but long term trends bad

The Daily Democrat, which seems to be turning into the Woodland Daily Entomologist, carries a feature by Art Shapiro on his observations of butterflies in our region. Shapiro has been systematically counting butterflies in Northern California for thirty years, building …
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Tanker fire causes East Bay freeway collapse – KCRA

The crash of a fuel tanker early Sunday morning took out a chunk of freeway leading to the Bay Bridge from Oakland to San Francisco. To say that today’s commute in the Bay Area is going to be “the most …
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Everybody’s getting into olive oil

A small college in Southern California — apparently they work on rockets, or something — is following UC Davis’s lead in the olive oil business. Olive trees are shady, but their fruit makes a mess. A couple of years ago …
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Dalai Lama to visit Sacramento, maybe UC Davis in 2009

The Sacramento Business Journal reports that the Dalai Lama is to visit Sacramento in Fall, 2009. A visit to the UC Davis MIND Institute is a “possibility,” the report says, noting that the Tibetan leader is interested in neuroscience. I …
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“Mathematical ecologist” to give Senate’s Distinguished Research Lecture

Alan Hastings, who applies math to ecology, will give the Academic Senate’s Distinguished Research Lecture May 1. News Service intern Erin Loury has written a profile for this week’s Dateline. The Distinguished Research Lecture is the highest award given by …
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Still running: Collapsing bees, toxic pet food

The story about disappearing bees continues to rumble along. The Knight Science Journalism Tracker rounds up some of the recent coverage, including incidents as far away as Taiwan. They’ll be missed: UC Davis entomologist Eric Mussen tells the LA Times …
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Lee Iacocca’s Long View: Plug-in hybrids

Speaking on NPR this morning former Chrysler chief Lee Iacocca says, “I’ve become real fan in the past year of plug-in hybrids… that’s the wave of the future.” Seems like the world is catching up to what Andy Frank and …
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Tomatoes once tasted like cucumbers?

Japanese scientists have found that wild relatives of the domestic tomato contain genes that would have made them taste more like cucumbers. Tomato flavors come from a class of compounds called C6 aldehydes, while cucumbers and melons make both C6 …
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LA Times picks up PCBs story

The Los Angeles Times picks up yesterday’s UCSF press release on a type of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causing brain development problems in rat pups. The changes could be similar to those seen in autistic children, according to the researchers. Isaac …
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Debate as old as fossils: What were T. rex’s arms for?

Scientific American’s ‘Ask the Experts’ column takes on the question of what T. rex’s weedy arms were for. (Though I doubt that anyone at the time was going to say that within her hearing.) Previous explanations have ranged from copulation …
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