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Monthly Archives: September 2008

Old growth forests still big carbon sinks

Recent research published in the journal Nature shows that mature forests still sock away plenty of carbon, as much as 1.3 billion metric tons a year. It had been assumed that long-established trees would be “carbon-neutral,” while young trees would …
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Researcher Protection Act (AB 2296) now law

Over the weekend, Governor Schwarzenegger signed 64 bills and vetoed 131. Among those he signed was AB 2296, the Researcher Protection Act, which enacts a number of measures to protect researchers from attacks by animal rights activists and others. The …
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U.S. Judge: Geneva not in my jurisdiction

A federal judge in Hawaii dismissed a lawsuit against the Large Hadron Collider, noting that federal courts don’t have jurisdiction over the border between France and Switzerland. The plaintiffs sued because they think the Collider could create a Black Hole …
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Parasitic nematode genome sequenced

Researchers at North Carolina State University, UC Davis, the Joint Genome Institute and UC Berkeley have completed sequencing the genome of the northern root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne hapla, a worm that parasitizes plants causing $50 billion of damage a year. It …
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Solid ice may exist deep inside planets

Water may exist as a solid deep within the Earth or in the interior of the planets Uranus and Neptune, according to researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab and UC Davis. Eric Schwegler at LLNL, and Giulia Galli, Francois …
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“Dark flow” across the universe

To dark matter and dark energy, add a new mystery: astronomers at NASA, the University of Hawaii and UC Davis have found a “dark flow,” or a large-scale movement of distant galaxy clusters, that cannot be accounted for with current …
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UC Davis experts on the Wall Street meltdown

(Contributed by Dateline editor Clifton Parker) With America facing the worst financial meltdown since the Great Depression and markets worldwide reeling from the deepening crisis, it is time to ask UC Davis economics experts two questions: What happened, and what …
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Movie premiere: The Atom Smashers

A new movie about the hunt for the Higgs boson, “The Atom Smashers,” premieres at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago Sept. 19 as part of the Science Chicago festival. More about the event here. From the movie …
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New book: How Wikipedia works

UC Davis reference librarian Phoebe Ayers is co-author of a new book about the online encyclopedia Wikipedia, “How Wikipedia Works — And How You Can Be a Part of It.” The book explains how to use Wikipedia, both as a …
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Catalysis research: Key to energy independence

An op-ed piece in today’s Seattle Times calls for a big boost in funding for fundamental research on catalysts, compounds that make chemical reactions work faster. Major breakthroughs in catalysis research could make it possible to turn biomass, or heavy …
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