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Monthly Archives: May 2010

Katehi discusses best practices in Tech Transfer

Gene Quinn, a patent attorney who blogs at IPWatchdog.com, recently posted a report on a presentation by Chancellor Linda Katehi at the BIO 2010 conference, followed by a Q&A. Reinforcing Dave Kappos’ remarks during his visit to UC Davis last …
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Bike controls and the pedal desk

Professors Mont Hubbard and Ron Hess in Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering are running a project to study bicycle-human control systems. It turns out, says Hess, that this is a harder problem to study than his usual field: pilots flying airplanes. …
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UC Davis experts comment on “artificial life”

A bacterial cell running on synthetic DNA has been created by researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute, it was widely reported today. A paper on the work is published online by the journal Science today. Looking at the press …
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Head of US Patent Office backs new approach to tech transfer

I recently had the chance to talk to David Kappos, under secretary of commerce for intellectual property and director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Kappos has a degree in electrical engineering from UC Davis and has some …
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Must-read from the Gulf: How much is a turtle worth?

Michael Ziccardi, director of the Oiled Wildlife Care Network, has been blogging from the Gulf of Mexico where he his helping organize cleanup efforts. In this post Ziccardi discusses the costs of saving wildlife from oil spills. Wildlife rescue is …
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Snowball Earth and Carbon Swings

Last week a team of geologists from Princeton University published a paper in Science showing a massive change in the Earth’s carbon cycle some 720 million years ago. At the time, the Earth may have been in a “snowball” phase: …
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