Skip directly to: Main page content

Category Archives: Astronomy and space

NSF funds NetSage to analyze, improve international data networks

Every day, thousands of researchers rely on robust data networks to share petabytes of data with their colleagues around the world. A new $5 million, five-year National Science Foundation grant, awarded to Indiana University, the University of California, Davis and …
Continue reading about NSF funds NetSage to analyze, improve international data networks

Cosmic collisions wake up snoozing galaxies

Galaxies are often found grouped into clusters, which contain many ‘red and dead’ members that stopped forming stars in the distant past. Now astronomers have found that when galaxy clusters collide, the resulting shockwave can “wake up” these dormant galaxies …
Continue reading about Cosmic collisions wake up snoozing galaxies

First stone laid for Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

A new map of the heavens took a big step forward last week as scientists and dignitaries, including Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, laid the first stone for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope on the 8900-foot summit of Cerro Pachón in …
Continue reading about First stone laid for Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

Cosmic lens splits supernova into four images

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have for the first time spotted four images of the same distant exploding star, arranged in an “Einstein’s Cross,” a cross-shape pattern created by the powerful gravity of a foreground galaxy embedded in a …
Continue reading about Cosmic lens splits supernova into four images

Core work: Iron vapor gives clues to formation of Earth and Moon

By Kat Kerlin Recreating the violent conditions of Earth’s formation, scientists are learning more about how iron vaporizes and how this iron rain affected the formation of the Earth and Moon. The study is published March 2 in Nature Geoscience. …
Continue reading about Core work: Iron vapor gives clues to formation of Earth and Moon

Diamonds and other treasures found in Sutter’s Mill meteorite

By Kat Kerlin Researchers digging deeper into the origins of the Sutter’s Mill meteorite, which exploded over California’s Gold Country in 2012, have found diamonds and other “treasures” that provide important new insight into the early days of our solar …
Continue reading about Diamonds and other treasures found in Sutter’s Mill meteorite

Making oxygen before life

About one-fifth of the Earth’s atmosphere is oxygen, pumped out by green plants as a result of photosynthesis and used by most living things on the planet to keep our metabolisms running. But before the first photosynthesizing organisms appeared about …
Continue reading about Making oxygen before life

Dust to dust: BICEP2 result on gravitational waves may not be so strong

Earlier this year, physicists celebrated results from the BICEP2 experiment which reported evidence of gravitational waves, a signature of cosmic inflation immediately after the Big Bang. But earlier this week, results from the Planck space telescope cast doubt on the …
Continue reading about Dust to dust: BICEP2 result on gravitational waves may not be so strong

UC Davis-led team achieves first light for flying infrared instrument

As we blogged last week, the EXES (Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph) instrument, a collaboration involving UC Davis and NASA Ames scientists and engineers and led by research scientist Matthew J. Richter of the UC Davis Physics Department, successfully carried out its first …
Continue reading about UC Davis-led team achieves first light for flying infrared instrument

SOFIA flying observatory passing over tonight

The SOFIA flying lab will make its second flight with the EXES experiment on board tonight. The EXES (Echelon-Cross-Echelle-Spectrograph) project is lead by UC Davis phyicist Matt Richter. The flight plan should have SOFIA, which operates out of Palmdale, Calif., …
Continue reading about SOFIA flying observatory passing over tonight