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Category Archives: Evolution

Over-evolved: Specialist jaw doomed Lake Victoria’s cichlid fish

By Betsy Towner Levine A UC Davis Evolution and Ecology team has discovered that cichlid fishes in Africa’s Lake Victoria have suffered a unique and unexpected effect of evolutionary adaptation: mass extinction. While a graduate student in Interim Dean Peter …
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Does hunting explain why zebras are not domesticated?

By Kathleen Holder Why do people ride horses but not their striped African cousins? A few zebras have accepted a rider or pulled a cart, but zebras have never been truly domesticated — and for good reason: They can be …
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Oxygen oasis in Antarctic lake reflects distant past

At the bottom of a frigid Antarctic lake, a thin layer of green slime is generating a little oasis of oxygen, a team including UC Davis researchers has found. It’s the first modern replica discovered of conditions on Earth two …
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Bugs and slugs ideal houseguests for seagrass health

By Kat Kerlin Marine “bugs and slugs” make ideal houseguests for valuable seagrass ecosystems. They gobble up algae that could smother the seagrass, keeping the habitat clean and healthy. That’s according to results from an unprecedented experiment spanning the Northern …
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Bee/orchid evolution wins Packard Fellowship

Santiago Ramirez, an assistant professor in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has been awarded a Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation. Ramirez is one …
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New sequencing reveals genetic history of tomatoes

By Roger Chetelat This week, an international team of researchers, led by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, is publishing in the journal Nature Genetics a brief genomic history of tomato breeding, based on sequencing of 360 varieties …
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With climate changing, Southern plants do better than Northern locals

Can plants and animals evolve to keep pace with climate change? A study published May 19 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that for at least one widely-studied plant, the European climate is changing fast …
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Algae “see” a wide spectrum of light

Aquatic algae can sense an unexpectedly wide range of color, allowing them to sense and adapt to changing light conditions in lakes and oceans. The study by researchers at UC Davis was published earlier this year in the journal Proceedings …
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Name that pupfish!

Getting to name new species must be one of the small pleasures of being a biologist. And if you’ve spent much of your Ph.D. painstakingly breeding thousands of hybrids of tiny fish, then flown with them to the Bahamas, you …
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BGI, UC Davis to host international genomics conference this Fall

The cutting-edge role of genomics — large-scale sequencing and analysis of DNA — in medicine, agriculture and science will be the topics of  the Second International Conference on Genomics in the Americas, to be held in Sacramento, Sept. 12-13. The …
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