Vasectomy Alternative Gets Boost at California Primate Center

By Carlos Villatoro

The successful application of an alternative male contraceptive in rhesus macaque monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center is paving  the way for human clinical trials.

For over a century, men who did not want to father a child had only one permament option for contraception. But according to the results of a study conducted at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC), there could be an alternative to a vasectomy that is as efficient and has the potential to be easily and successfully reversible.

Tests with rhesus monkeys show that Vasalgel shows potential as an alternative to vasectomy. (K. West, UC Davis)

Tests with rhesus monkeys show that Vasalgel shows potential as an alternative to vasectomy. (K. West, UC Davis)

Campus resists rampaging squirrels

If you think there are a lot of squirrels on campus this year, you’re right. That’s because the eastern fox squirrels arrived a couple of years ago and their numbers have boomed, pushing out native squirrels, damaging trees and potentially causing other problems (apparently, like rats, they like to chew electrical wiring).

Campus wildlife researchers are working with grounds staff on a plan to control the squirrels by trapping them and giving them birth-control shots. Phase 1 of the plan — trapping and releasing the animals, to see if it affects their behavior — goes into effect this month.