A Better Way to Stop Pests at the Border

By Kat Kerlin

Plants imported into the United States sometimes hold more than leaves and stems. They also can transport hidden, non-native pests and pathogens that can cause substantial ecological and economic damage if they establish in the environment.

Pests, such as this citrus long horned beetle, can be accidentally imported in cross-border shipments of live plants. (Wikipedia)

Pests, such as this citrus long horned beetle, can be accidentally imported in cross-border shipments of live plants. (Wikipedia)

In the United States, that pathway is growing. Over the past four decades, the dollar value of imported plants has grown at 68 percent per decade. One means of reducing their entry is to inspect live plant imports at the U.S. border.

Biological invasions threaten global economies and biodiversity

Developing nations particularly at risk

By Kat Kerlin

With the increasing pace of globalization comes the movement of invasive non-native species around the planet. Although often seen as a “first-world problem,” a new study shows these invasions threaten the economies and livelihoods of residents in some of the world’s poorest nations.

The harlequin ladybird was introduced to North America from Asia in 1916 to control aphids. It has spread to Europe and though beloved by many, is considered a pest in some regions. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

The harlequin ladybird was introduced to North America from Asia in 1916 to control aphids. It has spread to Europe and though beloved by many, is considered a pest in some regions. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Campus resists rampaging squirrels

If you think there are a lot of squirrels on campus this year, you’re right. That’s because the eastern fox squirrels arrived a couple of years ago and their numbers have boomed, pushing out native squirrels, damaging trees and potentially causing other problems (apparently, like rats, they like to chew electrical wiring).

Campus wildlife researchers are working with grounds staff on a plan to control the squirrels by trapping them and giving them birth-control shots. Phase 1 of the plan — trapping and releasing the animals, to see if it affects their behavior — goes into effect this month.