Graphene Layered with Magnetic Materials Could Drive Ultrathin Spintronics

Scientists with instrument

UC Davis project scientist Gong Chen (right) and coauthor Andres Schmid of Lawrence Berkeley Lab with the SPLEEM instrument used for imaging magnetic fields inside materials. Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt/LBL.

Tiny swirling textures in the magnetic fields within layered materials could be a key to replacing disk drives and flash memory in computing devices. Physicists at UC Davis and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are exploring how these patterns form in materials layered with graphene, an ultrathin form of carbon. A paper on the work was published online May 28 in Nature Materials.

New Technique Makes Light Metallic Nanofoam

By Becky Oskin

A simple method for manufacturing extremely low-density palladium nanofoams could help advance hydrogen storage technologies, reports a new study from the University of California, Davis.

Palladium nanofoam

UC Davis physicists Dustin Gilbert, Kai Liu and colleagues have come up with a new method to make a nanofoam of palladium. The foamy metal could be used to store hydrogen in vehicles or for other purposes. (Image credit: Dustin Gilbert and Kai Liu, UC Davis)