Success Is Not Just How You Play Your Cards, But How You Play Your Opponents

  •  Poker-playing techniques can apply to strategies in many situations
  • Study can influence scientific approaches to negotiation
  • By Karen Nikos-Rose

    In high-stakes environments, success is not just about playing your cards right, but also playing your opponents right.

    Looking at how more than 35,000 individuals interacted when playing millions of poker hands online during a three-week period, a University of California, Davis, study published today reveals that game experts are an excellent source of insight into how people process strategic information in competitive settings.

    Curiosity Finds Organic (Carbon-based) Material in Gale Crater, Mars

    The Mars Curiosity rover team announced today (June 7) finding organic matter – carbon-based compounds – in three billion year old mudstone sediments from Gale Crater. They also found seasonal changes in the amount of methane in the local atmosphere.

    Scientist and Mars rover

    Dawn Sumner is a member of the Mars Curiosity team.

    Dawn Sumner, professor of earth and planetary sciences at UC Davis, is a member of the Mars Curiosity team and coauthor on the first paper. She helps with sample selection and mission planning and was instrumental in promoting Gale Crater as a landing site for Curiosity.

    Podcast: New Insight on Spinal Injuries

    Spinal injuries are life-changing, and it used to be thought that recovery of limb movement below the injury was impossible. But new research is showing that with the right therapies, the body can find ways to work around spinal injuries. Professor Karen Moxon of the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering talks about her work with rats and how they can recover from injury.

    Listen: Three Minute Egghead: New Insight on Spinal Injuries (Soundcloud)

    More information

    Working Around Spinal Injuries (News release)

    Cortex-dependent recovery of unassisted hindlimb locomotion after complete spinal cord injury in adult rats (eLife)

     

    Biology Researchers Make Cell Metabolism “Best of 2017”           

    Two different teams of researchers from the College of Biological Sciences are represented in the “Best of 2017” issue of the prominent journal Cell Metabolism. Their papers, on insulin-producing beta cells and on the effects of a low-carb diet on longevity in mice, are among just five research articles chosen to appear in the special issue along with two clinical reports and four review articles.

    Pancreatic islet

    Pancreatic islets make insulin in response to blood glucose. Mark Huising/UC Davis

    Volcanologists Watch Kilauea Eruption

    Kilauea volcano on the island of Hawaii continues to erupt, creating spectacular footage of lava shooting out of vents and eating cars. While the lava flows are slow moving, and so far no one has been hurt, U.S. Geological Survey scientists were today (May 10) warning that the volcano might erupt explosively, sending large rocks flying through the air.

    This 8-10 ton boulder fell on a landing strip about a kilometer from Halema‘uma‘u crater during the eruption of May, 1924 (USGS photo collection).

    Breast Milk Nourishes Probiotics for Healthy Babies

    Earlier this week NPR broadcast a story about growing interest in giving probiotics – beneficial bacteria that live in the gut – to babies. Mark Underwood, professor of pediatrics, explained that in UC Davis neonatal care unit, all premature babies under a certain weight are given a probiotic to prevent necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC),a potentially deadly inflammation of the intestine. It’s becoming a common practice in premature infants, and Underwood and colleagues have carried out a clinical trial in full-term infants. They showed that newborns fed a supplement containing Bifidobacterium bacteria (thought to be beneficial) had more “good bacteria” and fewer “bad bacteria” in their guts two months later.

    Rugosity and Concentricity: In Urban Planning, Look to Edges, Not Just The Core

    By Karen Nikos-Rose

    Catherine Brinkley is a professor of human and community development and human ecology at UC Davis. So it’s interesting that in a recent published paper, she advocates that cities should work more like coral reefs — supporting a diversity of niches and uses for sustained vigor and resilience. In ecology and medical sciences, the term for a physical form with such topographic complexity is rugosity.

    Rugosity versus concentricity

    Traditional urban planning favors “concentric” layouts with a downtown core surrounded by suburbs and farmland (right). But Catherine Brinkley argues instead that cities should plan for “rugosity” (left) with more interfaces between functions.

    Making an Impact in Research: Advice from Experience, Pitch Slams from Grad Students

    Sometimes there’s just too much going on at UC Davis. Today, you could hear from two groups of researchers at very different points in their careers, looking to make an impact and talking about how to have an impact with research.

    Today’s UC Davis Research Expo was put on by the Office of Research with the theme “Pathways to Impact”. This afternoon, the Office of Graduate Studies hosted the final UC Davis round of the Grad Slam competition.

    Panel discussion

    A panel of accomplished UC Davis scientists (and one classicist) discuss how to make an impact with your research at the UC Davis Research Expo, April 5, 2018.

    With Giant Lens, Astronomers Find a Single Star Across Half the Universe

    Through a lucky quirk of nature, astronomers have used the Hubble Space Telescope to view a single star halfway across the universe. Nine billion light years from Earth, the giant blue-white star, nicknamed “Icarus” by the team, is by far the most distant individual star ever seen.

    Distant star image

    Icarus is the farthest individual star ever seen. It is only visible because it is magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, located about 5 billion light-years from Earth. The panels at right show the view in 2011, without Icarus visible, and the star’s brightening in 2016. (Hubble/STScI)

    Study That Cast Doubt on Mouse CRISPR-Cas9 Retracted

    A study that cast doubt on the usefulness of CRISPR-Cas9 “gene editing” technology to introduce genetic changes in animals has been retracted by the journal Nature Methods. Among those refuting the work were Professor Kent Lloyd, director of the UC Davis Mouse Biology Program, and colleagues from the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium, whose letter was one of five published by the journal March 30.

    CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to introduce very specific edits into DNA. In laboratory mice, the technology could be used to make edits in embryos that are then grown to adult mice. One of the attractions of CRISPR-Cas9 is that it is supposed to make these edits without affecting other genes.