Podcast: New Insight on Spinal Injuries

Spinal injuries are life-changing, and it used to be thought that recovery of limb movement below the injury was impossible. But new research is showing that with the right therapies, the body can find ways to work around spinal injuries. Professor Karen Moxon of the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering talks about her work with rats and how they can recover from injury.

Listen: Three Minute Egghead: New Insight on Spinal Injuries (Soundcloud)

More information

Working Around Spinal Injuries (News release)

Cortex-dependent recovery of unassisted hindlimb locomotion after complete spinal cord injury in adult rats (eLife)

 

Podcast: Plant Biochemist is Top Teacher

In this episode of the Three Minute Egghead podcast, meet Judy Callis, professor of molecular and cellular biology, who has just received the UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement.

Professor Judy Callis studies the ubiquitin system in plants. She is recipient of the 2018 UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement.

Callis teaches biochemistry and her lab studies the ubiquitin system in plants. Once thought to be a way to tag proteins inside cells for “garbage disposal,” ubiquitin turns out to have a ubiquitous role in regulating metabolism.

Listen: https://soundcloud.com/andy-fell/plant-biochemist-is-uc-davis-top-teacher

Engineer Takes Part in Eclipse Experiment

For most of us Monday’s solar eclipse was a wonderful spectacle, but some scientists were out gathering data, too. Holly Oldroyd, assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, joined a team led by Chad Higgins at Oregon State University to measure atmospheric fluxes during the eclipse.

As night turns to day and back there are changes in atmospheric temperature and pressure, water vapor and carbon dioxide, and in emissions from soils and plants into the atmosphere. Higgins’ experiment aimed to find out whether the same kinds of changes take place during the very short “night” created by the total solar eclipse. Normally these measurements are taken over time spans of half an hour or so, so the team, which also included researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, had to come up with ways to make accurate measurements over a couple of minutes.