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Author Archives: Andy Fell

Icelandic volcano sits on massive magma hot spot

Spectacular eruptions at Bárðarbunga volcano in central Iceland have been spewing lava continuously since Aug. 31. Massive amounts of erupting lava are connected to the destruction of supercontinents and dramatic changes in climate and ecosystems. New research from UC Davis …
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Bee/orchid evolution wins Packard Fellowship

Santiago Ramirez, an assistant professor in the Department of Evolution and Ecology at the UC Davis College of Biological Sciences, has been awarded a Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation. Ramirez is one …
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New sequencing reveals genetic history of tomatoes

By Roger Chetelat This week, an international team of researchers, led by the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, is publishing in the journal Nature Genetics a brief genomic history of tomato breeding, based on sequencing of 360 varieties …
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Medicine Nobel: How the brain makes sense of place

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to three neuroscientists, John O’Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser, for their discoveries of brain cells that allow us to make sense of place and location and navigate …
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Could Western China repeat California’s success in agriculture?

By Colin Carter Recently I joined a large delegation from UC Davis, led by Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, at the 80th anniversary celebration of China’s Northwest Agricultural and Forestry University in Shaanxi province, including an international forum on the development …
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Making oxygen before life

About one-fifth of the Earth’s atmosphere is oxygen, pumped out by green plants as a result of photosynthesis and used by most living things on the planet to keep our metabolisms running. But before the first photosynthesizing organisms appeared about …
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Curiosity helps learning and memory

Curiosity helps us learn about a topic, and being in a curious state also helps the brain memorize unrelated information, according to researchers at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience. Work published Oct. 2 in the journal Neuron provides insight …
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Dust to dust: BICEP2 result on gravitational waves may not be so strong

Earlier this year, physicists celebrated results from the BICEP2 experiment which reported evidence of gravitational waves, a signature of cosmic inflation immediately after the Big Bang. But earlier this week, results from the Planck space telescope cast doubt on the …
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Grant to help commercialize silicon surgical blades

A UC Davis engineering professor has received a grant of $200,000 from the National Science Foundation “Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research- Technology Translation” program to move his silicon-based blades towards commercial development as surgical and shaving tools. Silicon or …
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Baby desert tortoises get a headstart in the Mojave

A baby desert tortoise lies on its back atop a scale inside a new building at Mojave National Preserve. It wriggles—slowly­—its arms and feet like an infant on a changing table. The site, the Ivanpah Desert Tortoise Research Facility, is …
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