Experts In Human, Horse Stem Cells Join World Stem Cell Summit

Event Includes Horse Therapies For First Time

By Pat Bailey

Four UC Davis researchers with expertise in the application of stem cell science for therapies in human or veterinary medicine are slated to speak during the World Stem Cell Summit in Palm Beach, Florida, Dec. 6-9.

UC Davis researchers are exploring stem cell technology to treat both horses and humans. Photo by Karin Higgins/UC Davis.

UC Davis researchers are exploring stem cell technology to treat both horses and humans. Photo by Karin Higgins/UC Davis.

This will be the 12th consecutive year that the summit has brought together scientists, physicians and veterinarians, industry representatives and patient advocates from around the world to share medical breakthroughs in stem cell research, also known as regenerative medicine.

SNO+ Neutrino Detector Gets Ready For Run

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SNO+ neutrino detector being filled with ultrapure water. The detector will search for neutrinos from distant supernovae and nuclear reactors. Credit: SNO+ Collaboration

 

Not a still from a science fiction movie, but the SNO+ neutrino detector being filled with very pure water prior to starting operations. Located over a mile underground in a mine in Ontario, Canada, the SNO+ detector consists of an acrylic sphere 12 meters in diameter filled with 800 tonnes of scintillation fluid, floating in a bath of ultrapure water surrounded by 10,000 photomultiplier tubes that will detect flashes of light from passing neutrinos.

UC Davis Veterinary Student Shares in Zika Virus Discoveries

By Pat Bailey

Hannah Laurence, a third-year student in the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute fellow, had the privilege of doing biomedical research during the past year in the laboratory of Professor Jeff Kieft at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Vet student with horse

UC Davis veterinary student Hannah Laurence studied Zika virus through a HHMI fellowship.

Recently, the Kieft lab announced in the journal Science discovery of the molecular process used by the Zika virus to “hijack” the cells that it infects and potentially how the virus makes molecules that are directly linked to disease.

LASER Art/Science Series Reboots

By Jeffrey Day

A series at UC Davis that brings together art and science restarts with a new format, location, time and leadership. The Leonardo Art, Science, Evening Rendezvous (LASER) will be re-launched Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. in the Art Annex room 107.laser-logo

Free and open to the pubic, LASER at UC Davis is being co-directed by Timothy Hyde, assistant professor, Department of Art and Art History, and Jiayi Young, assistant professor, Department of Design.

Three Minute Egghead: Finding the Furthest, Faintest Galaxy

In the latest episode of the Three Minute Egghead podcast, UC Davis astronomer Marusa Bradac explains why she’s looking towards the beginning of time to find the furthest, faintest object in the universe, and how a gigantic lens in the sky can help.

Read the news release about this story here.

For more Three Minute Egghead podcasts, see our Soundcloud playlist here.

Podcast: Computer Model Is A “Crystal Ball” For E. Coli

In the latest episode of the Three Minute Egghead podcast, Ilias Tagkopoulos talks about a computer model that predicts the metabolism of the bacteria Escherichia coli. While E. coli might be one of the most-studied organisms both in labs and as a cause of disease, there is still much we don’t know about it, he notes.

Tagkopoulos and his team spent two years pulling together all the data they could find on E. coli, from DNA sequences to metabolism, and assembling it into a single database. They then used computer clusters and the Blue Waters supercomputer to create their model. You can access their data here.

Atom-by-Atom Growth Chart For Shells Helps Decode Past Climate

By Becky Oskin

For the first time scientists can see how the shells of tiny marine organisms grow atom-by-atom, a new study reports. The advance provides new insights into the mechanisms of biomineralization and will improve our understanding of environmental change in Earth’s past.

Foraminifera

Foraminifera are marine plankton with complex shells. The shells of dead forams in ocean sediments form a record of climate hundreds of millions of years into the past.

Led by researchers from the University of California, Davis and the University of Washington, with key support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the team examined an organic-mineral interface where the first calcium carbonate crystals start to appear in the shells of foraminifera, a type of plankton.

Latest Caterpillar Poll: Woolly Bears Are Undecided

With the third and final debate over, those voters who haven’t yet made up their minds will be focusing on their choice for President. But what do the woolly bear caterpillars of Bodega Bay have to say about the election?

Caterpillar

Woolly bear caterpillars are having a hard time picking the outcome of the 2016 Presidential election. (Eric Lo Presti/UC Davis)

The caterpillars shot to fame a few months ago when UC Davis graduate student Eric Lo Presti pointed out in a blog post that cycles in the caterpillar population tracked with the fortunes of political parties in presidential election years. Going back as far as 1984, Democrats won the White House in years when the caterpillars were abundant in March, and Republicans when the caterpillars were less prolific.

UC Davis Wildlife Museum Team In Papua New Guinea

By Andrew Engilis

On October 5th, two scientists from the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology joined a multi-national team of researchers to conduct biodiversity surveys on the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea.

Irene Engilis, UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology, extracts a bat from a mist net.

Irene Engilis, UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology, extracts a bat from a mist net.

The expedition is coordinated by Allen Allison, senior zoologist at the Bishop Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii. Allison obtained his B.S and Ph.D. from UC Davis and has organized and led numerous research expeditions over the past 40 years in Papua New Guinea.

Scientists Explore the Foggy Link Between Redwoods, Climate Change

By Lorena Anderson, UC Merced

California’s coastal redwoods are one of the state’s most prominent icons, drawing more than 2 million visitors a year. Another prominent icon? Fog, winding its way across the coast and through the trees. Climate change may be impacting both of them.

Climate change may affect the fog that waters California's iconic coastal redwoods.

Climate change may affect the fog that waters California’s iconic coastal redwoods.

While coastal redwoods typically get plenty of water during the winter, fog helps them get through the summer. But fog is on the decline. What that means for the coastal redwoods in currently unclear.