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Author Archives: Andy Fell

Cosmic collisions wake up snoozing galaxies

Galaxies are often found grouped into clusters, which contain many ‘red and dead’ members that stopped forming stars in the distant past. Now astronomers have found that when galaxy clusters collide, the resulting shockwave can “wake up” these dormant galaxies …
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First stone laid for Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

A new map of the heavens took a big step forward last week as scientists and dignitaries, including Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, laid the first stone for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope on the 8900-foot summit of Cerro Pachón in …
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UC Davis reactor gets a role in Mars mission

By Jocelyn Anderson As NASA prepares for manned missions into deep space, UC Davis’ McClellan Nuclear Research Center is playing an integral role in the groundwork. The center recently helped develop a technique for performing neutron radiography on a breakable …
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UC Davis lands three new USDA food safety grants

By Pat Bailey UC Davis scientists are leading three new research projects on food safety, recently funded with more than $5 million in grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. These grants are part …
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Math links ecological flash mobs and magnet physics

By Kat Kerlin How does an acorn know to fall when the other acorns do? What triggers insects, or disease, to suddenly break out over large areas? Why do fruit trees have boom and bust years? The question of what …
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Rice can “borrow” stronger immunity from other plant species, study shows

Like most other plants, rice is well equipped with an effective immune system that enables it to detect and fend off disease-causing microbes. But that built-in immunity can be further boosted when the rice plant receives a receptor protein from …
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Cosmic lens splits supernova into four images

Astronomers using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope have for the first time spotted four images of the same distant exploding star, arranged in an “Einstein’s Cross,” a cross-shape pattern created by the powerful gravity of a foreground galaxy embedded in a …
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So-called mute cicadas are not so silent

By Kathy Keatley Garvey Are “mute” cicadas really mute? If so, how do they communicate and attract mates? A team of scientists including Christian Nansen, agricultural entomologist at UC Davis, answers these questions in a new paper, “How Do ‘Mute’ …
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Core work: Iron vapor gives clues to formation of Earth and Moon

By Kat Kerlin Recreating the violent conditions of Earth’s formation, scientists are learning more about how iron vaporizes and how this iron rain affected the formation of the Earth and Moon. The study is published March 2 in Nature Geoscience. …
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UC Davis leads new effort in livestock genomics

By Pat Bailey Scientists and breeders working with poultry and livestock species will get a new set of tools from an international project that includes the University of California, Davis. The UC Davis team is led by functional genomicist Huaijun …
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