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Author Archives: Andy Fell

UC Davis-led team achieves first light for flying infrared instrument

As we blogged last week, the EXES (Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph) instrument, a collaboration involving UC Davis and NASA Ames scientists and engineers and led by research scientist Matthew J. Richter of the UC Davis Physics Department, successfully carried out its first …
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How brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring how these brain regions develop at this crucial time. Eventually, …
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Plants, worms, people and cancer

What do plants and worms and humans have in common, and how can they help humans? To address that deceptively simple question, Professors Anne Britt of Plant Biology and JoAnne Engebrecht of Molecular and Cellular Biology are collaborating through the …
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SOFIA flying observatory passing over tonight

The SOFIA flying lab will make its second flight with the EXES experiment on board tonight. The EXES (Echelon-Cross-Echelle-Spectrograph) project is lead by UC Davis phyicist Matt Richter. The flight plan should have SOFIA, which operates out of Palmdale, Calif., …
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Modeling of silicon nanoparticles for solar energy

Silicon nanoparticles embedded in a zinc sulfide matrix are a promising material for new types of solar cell. Computational modeling by Stefan Wipperman, Gergely Zimanyi, Francois Gygi and Giulia Galli at UC Davis and colleagues shows how such a material …
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Hubble weighs the “El Gordo” colliding galaxy cluster

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has weighed the largest known galaxy cluster in the distant universe and found that it definitely lives up to its nickname: El Gordo, Spanish for “the fat one.” By precisely measuring how much the gravity from …
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First peanut genomes sequenced

The genome of the peanut, a staple food for millions in the developing world as well as an important cash crop, has been sequenced by a multinational consortium including researchers at the UC Davis Genome Center. The new peanut genome …
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Infrared observatory to take flight

On March 31, a team from UC Davis and NASA Ames installed the EXES Science Instrument aboard SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. EXES (Echelon-Cross-Echelle Spectrograph) is designed to observe light in the mid-infrared at high resolution. It operates …
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Physicists reflect on gravity wave discovery

Contributed by Lloyd Knox, Department of Physics On March 17, the scientific world was shaken by a dramatic announcement: Astronomers reported what many consider to be the “smoking gun” of a theorized stage in the very early evolution of the …
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Honda Smart Home Open House is March 25

There will be a community open house at the Honda Smart Home in West Village on campus next Tuesday afternoon, March 25, noon to 4 p.m.. If you’ve been wondering what this zero-net energy smart home is all about, this …
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